The Patent Dispute Over Gene Editing Technologies: The Broad Institute, Inc. vs. The Regents of the University of California

CRISPR-Cas9 editing of the genomeThe patent dispute already called “the biggest in biotech history” is only getting started. On January 11, 2016, Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) Deborah Katz officially declared an interference over patents for the CRISPR-Cas gene editing technologies. An interference is a U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) administrative proceeding conducted to determine which of multiple claimants to a particular invention has priority rights. Since the patents in question were filed before the March 2013 effective date of the America Invents Act, priority will be awarded to the claimant who was the first to invent the technology in question. This dispute pits Feng Zhang, the Broad Institute, and MIT against Jennifer Doudna and the University of California-Berkeley as well as Emmanuelle Charpentier, Krzysztof Chylinski, and the University of Vienna. Law professor Jacob S. Sherkow has followed the case closely and has provided useful background information on Stanford’s Law and Biosciences Blog.
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Filed under Genomics & Society, Legal & Regulatory, Patent Litigation, Patents & IP, Pending Litigation

Genetic Discrimination Case Against School District is Appealed to Ninth Circuit

classroom-1534186As Stephanie M. Lee reported for Buzzfeed in a well-written account (which contains links to the relevant court documents), an appeal was filed in January with the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in the case of Chadam v. Palo Alto Unified School District (4:13-CV-04129-CW). At issue in the case is whether the school district violated a boy’s rights when it decided to force him to transfer schools. The student’s parents allege the transfer decision was because he is a carrier of a genetic variant associated with Cystic Fibrosis or CF (although he has not exhibited symptoms of the disease), and the appeal argues the trial court erred in dismissing the complaint that the school district’s decision to transfer violated his rights under Title II of the American’s with Disabilities Act or ADA (42 U.S.C.A. §12131 et seq.), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C.A. § 794), and the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. At the trial court level, the school district successfully defended its decision to transfer the boy by arguing it relied on medical advice and made the decision in an attempt to protect other children at the school who have CF.
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Filed under Badges, Genomics & Medicine, Genomics & Society, GINA, Privacy

EEOC Tries to Harmonize ACA’s Promotion of Employer Wellness Programs with GINA’s Ban Against Employer Access to Genetic Information of Employees and Employees’ Family Members

Gina name tagThe Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is responsible for enforcing Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA), which prohibits employers from requesting genetic information (defined broadly) from their prospective, current, or former employees. GINA contains only six limited exceptions to this prohibition, one of which is an exception for wellness programs in which the employee’s participation is voluntary.

On October 30, 2015 the EEOC issued a proposed rule to amend GINA regulations in an attempt to harmonize them with the Affordable Care Act’s promotion of employer wellness programs to lower health care costs.
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Filed under Badges, General Interest, GINA, Legal & Regulatory, Privacy, Privacy, Privacy

Australia revokes Myriad’s three patent claims on isolated BRCA1 DNA

genome sequenceIn a decision issued on October 7, 2015, the High Court of Australia (High Court) ruled unanimously in D’Arcy v. Myriad Genetics Inc., [2015] HCA 35, that three BRCA1 patent claims held by Myriad Genetics, Inc. under Australian Patent 686,004 were invalid. While Myriad’s patent had actually expired on August 11, 2015, the court decision set important precedent relevant to intellectual property in genetics/omics and precision medicine.

The D’Arcy case itself, along with other litigation in the U.S. involving Myriad’s gene patents, has been discussed previously on Genomics Law Report (See generally here). Mutations in the BRCA1 gene confer increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. The Myriad scientists were first to clone and sequence BRCA1, the gene that Mary-Claire King had linked to cancer susceptibility in a landmark paper in Science in 1990. Myriad identified several BRCA1 mutations. Myriad’s Australian Patent 686,004 contains 30 separate claims. Yvonne D’Arcy challenged the validity of the first three claims in Myriad’s patent, which claimed the isolated BRCA1 sequences with mutations conferring increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer.
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Filed under Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomics & Medicine, Legal & Regulatory, Myriad Gene Patent Litigation, Patent Litigation, Patents & IP

How Privacy Law Affects Medical and Scientific Research

eyeball_nOver the last five or so years my law practice has focused increasingly on privacy law, both domestic and international. In hindsight, this was a predictable outcome: as an intellectual property lawyer, many of my clients do business on the Internet or are engaged in scientific research and development, with many of the latter in the health care area. These are the very kinds of people who need to worry about privacy—of their customers, users, patients, and subjects. As they started on focusing on privacy concerns, these clients turned to their IP lawyers for help, and my Robinson Bradshaw colleagues and I have tried to stay ahead of their needs.

As a consequence of my growing privacy practice, I am regularly called on to give overviews to other lawyers as well as non-lawyers in the scientific and business communities. I thought it might be useful to devote a GLR post to a privacy law summary targeted at readers who conduct medical and other scientific research. Privacy law is a transnational mess, so this will be a bit longer than I’d like—my apologies, and please don’t shoot the messenger—but I’ll try to cut through the legal jargon.
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Filed under International Developments, Legal & Regulatory, Privacy

Are Software Patents Dead?—Alice’s Implications for Life Sciences

Not too long ago, getting patents on software and business methods was all the rage. And concern about their effects was profound. In fact, in 2003 I spoke at a Federal Reserve Bank conference devoted to the question of whether such patents were an existential threat to the financial industry. Now, after a series of Supreme Court cases that brought about a dramatic shift in the approach taken by the lower courts and the Patent Office, the question is whether those patents are still alive. The answer is that they are, but barely, and their prognosis is bad.

Do these developments matter to people in the life sciences? The answer is a resounding yes. If we then ask why software patentability matters, the answer is that life sciences are increasingly focused on software-dependent data analysis.

These points were brought home to me when I spoke at another, more recent conference—the Bio-IT World Conference in Boston this past April.
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Filed under Bioinformatics/IT, Industry News, Legal & Regulatory, Patent Litigation, Patents & IP

Conley Q & A on LDTs and the FDA

FDA v LDTIn her recent post on the FDA’s draft guidance on its proposed oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests (LDTs), Jen Wagner mentioned my interview with Genome Web’s Turna Ray on January 15, 2015. Turna asked me to address some arguments made in a “white paper” written by former U.S. Solicitor General Paul Clement and Harvard law professor Laurence Tribe on behalf of their client, the American Clinical Laboratory Association. The main point that Clement and Tribe made was that the FDA lacks legal authority to oversee LDTs, at least in the way that it’s proposing to do so. As I told Turna, I don’t necessarily disagree with their position; in fact, I’m skeptical about the FDA’s authority to do this. Also, like Jen, I’m not persuaded the proposed FDA initiative is likely to work well from a practical perspective. Nonetheless, I agreed to play along in a devil’s advocate exercise, making the counterarguments I’d make if representing the FDA. Here’s a brief summary of my arguments:
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Filed under Badges, FDA LDT Regulation, Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomic Policymaking, Genomics & Medicine, Legal & Regulatory, Pending Regulation, Uncategorized

Groundhog Day: FDA and Proposed Oversight of LDTs

FDA v LDTOnce again, attention in Washington, DC has turned to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and its proposed oversight of all laboratory developed tests (LDTs). The occasion for this attention was the FDA’s separate releases on October 3, 2014 of its proposed LDT framework and proposed notification and medical device reporting guidance. The former describes the basic structure for how the FDA intends to exercise its authority over LDTs as medical devices (e.g., risk classification and enforcement discretion categories), and the latter describes the process by which laboratories offering LDTs must notify the FDA of all LDTs (i.e., registration) and the adverse event reporting requirements that would apply to LDTs as medical devices (i.e., reporting of deaths, serious injuries, malfunctions, etc.). The agency hosted a public meeting on January 8-9, 2015 to discuss the proposed guidance and is accepting written public comments until February 2, 2015. [No joke: Comments are, in fact, due on Groundhog Day.]

• Comments on the proposed LDT framework (Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0360) can be submitted here.
• Comments on the proposed notification and medical device reporting (Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0357) can be submitted here.

The public meeting featuring speakers and panelists was organized into six topical sessions covering test components and labeling; clinical validity and intended use; categories for continued enforcement discretion; notification and adverse event reporting; classification and prioritization; and quality system regulation. The FDA has promised to post the transcript (and, in the meantime, some live tweets from the meeting will remain available on @DNAlawyer’s feed). Dr. Jeff Shuren started the meeting with a reminder that the FDA’s proposed guidance was based on discussions held five years ago, in 2010. (Prior GLR coverage is here.)
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Filed under Badges, FDA LDT Regulation, Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomic Policymaking, Genomics & Medicine, Pending Regulation

Australian appeals court upholds patents on isolated BRCA1 DNA

Robert Cook-Deegan, MD

Bob Cook-Deegan 0546.05 © Duke University Photography Jim WallaceOn September 5, the Federal Court of Australia (the appeals court) upheld a claim on isolated DNA from the BRCA1 gene. It dismissed Yvonne D’Arcy’s appeal of a case that has attracted international attention. Australian patent 686,004 has never been enforced, so the court decision has little real-world concrete impact. As Richard Gold and Julia Carbone explained in their classic case study, “Myriad Genetics: In the Eye of the Policy Storm,” the patent rights on BRCA1 and BRCA2 were exclusively licensed for use in Australia and New Zealand to Genetic Technologies, Ltd. (GTG), which in turn made them a “gift to the people of Australia.” When the CEO of GTG proposed taking back that gift in the summer of 2008, he provoked a firestorm and the company backed down in October, restating that it would not enforce its patent rights against laboratories offering BRCA testing. The Australian Senate held a series of hearings, and a bill proscribing DNA sequence patents was proposed, but the new government opposed it, and it lapsed. Instead, Australia enacted patent reforms in 2012 that raised the bar for utility and clarified the Australian law’s exemption from infringement liability for research and regulatory approval. Most of the provisions of that law took effect on April 15, 2013, the very day Association for Molecular Pathology v Myriad Genetics (AMP v Myriad) was argued before the U.S. Supreme Court.


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Filed under Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomic Sequencing, Genomics & Medicine, Genomics & Society, International Developments, International News, Legal & Regulatory, Myriad Gene Patent Litigation, Patent Litigation, Patents & IP

Medical Organizations Can’t Shape the Rules for Admitting Expert Testimony

96-well plateA little more than a year ago I wrote a post about the then-new Recommendations for Reporting of Incidental Findings in Clinical Exome and Genome Sequencing from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG). Those Recommendations (since modified somewhat) proposed that whenever a patient undergoes whole-genome or whole-exome sequencing (WES) for any purpose, the laboratory doing the testing should always sequence and report to the ordering physician the results for 57 (now 56) genes on the ACMG’s list. Among the questions I addressed in that post was this one: “Do those Recommendations become by definition the standard of care for the specialty, immediately or in the near future?” I wondered specifically about a future case in which a doctor ordered WES, the lab analyzed only the genes the doctor was interested in, leaving out some of the ACMG’s 56, and the patient subsequently suffered a bad medical outcome linked to an omitted gene. Would failure to follow the ACMG Recommendation be evidence—maybe even conclusive evidence—of malpractice?
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Filed under Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomics & Medicine