Myriad Finally Reaches the Supreme Court (But Only For a Moment)

Yesterday, the Supreme Court (as we predicted last week that it might) GVR’d the certiorari petitions (pdf) of both parties in the Myriad Genetics case.

Big news, right? Not really.

What this means is that the Court Granted cert in Myriad, but for the limited purpose of Vacating the Federal Circuit’s July 2011 decision and Remanding the case to that court for reconsideration in light of the Supreme Court’s decision last week in Prometheus.


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Filed under General Interest, Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomic Policymaking, Genomics & Society, Industry News, Legal & Regulatory, Myriad Gene Patent Litigation, Patents & IP, Pending Litigation

Prometheus Patents Struck Down, 9-0: Mayo Collaborative Services v. Prometheus Laboratories, Inc. Analysis

In a strong rebuke to the Federal Circuit, a unanimous U.S. Supreme Court held (pdf), on March 20, 2012, that Prometheus Laboratories’ claims to methods of administering drugs to treat gastrointestinal autoimmune diseases do not meet the patentable subject matter standard of section 101 of the Patent Act.  The representative claim quoted by the Court recites, “A method of optimizing therapeutic efficacy for treatment of an immune-mediated gastrointestinal disorder” comprising two steps: (a) administering one of a class of drugs (thiopurines) and (b) determining the level of a specified metabolite, “wherein” a level below a given threshold “indicates a need to increase the amount of said drug subsequently administered” [to improve efficacy], and a level above the threshold “indicates a need to decrease the amount of said drug subsequently administered” [to avoid toxicity].

History of the Case. Mayo originally bought and used Prometheus test kits that employed the patented method, but it then decided to sell and market its own test, which was similar, but not identical.  Prometheus sued for patent infringement.  The district court found that Mayo’s test would infringe the Prometheus patents, but it then held the patents invalid as essentially claiming unpatentable laws of nature–in this case, the relationship between the levels of the specified metabolite and the efficacy or toxicity of the relevant drugs.


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Filed under General Interest, Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomics & Medicine, Industry News, Legal & Regulatory, Myriad Gene Patent Litigation, Pending Litigation

On Genetic Rights and States: a Look at South Dakota and Around the U.S.

SD H.B. 1260, introduced in South Dakota on January 26, 2012, is an act that would govern the use of genetic information. By any standards – and especially by legislative standards – the two-page bill (pdf) is succinct and should not be considered a state variation of GINA, as the bill does not speak to non-discrimination issues.

The bill’s brevity should not, however, be mistaken for a narrowness of purpose. In under 200 words, the South Dakota bill, if passed, would (1) grant property rights to individuals in their DNA samples and genetic information, (2) prohibit surreptitious testing, (3) call into question many forensic and law enforcement uses of DNA, (4) eliminate newborn blood spot screening without explicit consent and (5) impose broadly worded informed consent requirements on all collections and uses of individual genetic data. So much for inefficient government.
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Filed under Biobanking, General Interest, Genomic Policymaking, Genomics & Society, Industry News, Informed Consent, Legal & Regulatory, Pending Regulation