Judicial and Legislative Reactions in California to Maryland v. King, 133 S. Ct. 1958 (2013)

window where the light gets inThis year’s first news in the area of genetics and criminal law comes to us from California, where both the judicial and legislative branches are reacting to the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Maryland v. King. In Maryland v. King, the Supreme Court upheld DNA fingerprinting as a routine booking procedure for serious crimes as authorized by Maryland’s DNA Collection Act. Justice Kennedy’s opinion in King indicated it was intended to be a narrow ruling, focused on the specific facets of Maryland’s state statute. This narrow scope effectively left other DNA fingerprinting schemes open to constitutional challenges if they could be distinguished from the details of the Maryland statute. Among those schemes are California’s Proposition 69 and the Federal DNA Fingerprint Act of 2005. The latter scheme was upheld en banc (all the judges of the circuit sitting together, rather than in the usual three-judge panel) by the Third Circuit Court of Appeals in United States v. Mitchell in 2011 (United States v. Mitchell, 652 F.3d 387 (3rd Cir. 2011) (en banc), pet. for cert. filed (Nov. 22, 2011) (No. 11-7603, 11A384), cert. denied – S.Ct. – (Mar. 19, 2012).
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Filed under Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomics & Society, Privacy

District Court Denies Myriad’s Preliminary Injunction Against Ambry

MyriadIn a 106-page opinion issued on March 10, 2014, Judge Robert Shelby of the federal district court in Salt Lake City denied Myriad Genetics’ Motion for Preliminary Injunction in its lawsuit against Ambry Genetics Corporation. For reasons I’ll try to explain, this is a significant development from a practical standpoint, but not earth-shaking from a legal point of view. Above all, it is not surprising. Reluctant as I am to say “I told you so,” well, I told you so.

As we previously reported, after the Supreme Court decided AMP v. Myriad Genetics, a number of competitors, including Ambry, jumped into the BRCA testing market. Myriad started suing them in the Utah federal district court, beginning with Ambry (filed July 9, 2013) and Gene by Gene (July 10). The cases were soon consolidated, to be handled together by Judge Shelby. In both cases, Myriad alleged that the defendant’s testing would infringe patent claims that had not been struck down by the Supreme Court’s AMP decision, which had held that DNA that had merely been isolated from the body was not patentable subject matter. In both cases, Myriad sought a preliminary injunction: a pre-trial order that the defendant must cease its testing activity for the duration of the case. If Myriad then prevailed at trial, the injunction would become permanent. The defendants denied Myriad’s allegations, opposed the preliminary injunction, and filed massive antitrust counterclaims alleging that Myriad has used its patents in unlawful ways to monopolize the BRCA testing market.
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Filed under Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomics & Medicine, Genomics & Society, Myriad Gene Patent Litigation, Patent Litigation, Patents & IP, Pending Litigation, Pending Regulation