EU Adopts New Privacy Shield for Data Transfers to U.S.

Back in April, we reported on some new developments in European Union law that have implications for the life sciences industry. One of these developments was in the privacy area—the final approval of the EU’s new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The GDPR will have enormous significance for medical research and practice, since it will govern the collection and use of health data related to EU citizens. This month has brought a complementary and equally significant development, this time dealing with the transfer of personal data—including health data—from the EU to the U.S.

On July 12, 2016, the European Union announced that it had formally adopted the long-awaited EU-U.S. Privacy Shield to permit the transfer of personal data from EU countries to the United States.
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Filed under International Developments, Privacy, Privacy, Privacy

The EEOC’s Final Rule on GINA and Employer-Sponsored Wellness Programs to Take Effect This Month

Gina name tagOn May 17, 2016, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which is the agency charged with enforcing Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA), issued a final rule changing how employers can set up incentives for the wellness programs they sponsor for their employees.

As previously reported on Genomics Law Report, on October 30, 2015 the EEOC had issued a proposed rule to amend the GINA regulations in an attempt to harmonize them with the Affordable Care Act’s promotion of employer wellness programs to lower health care costs. The EEOC indicated it had received more than 3000 public comments before the close of the comment period on January 28, 2016.

In short, the final rule allows employers to offer financial and in-kind incentives for an employee’s spouse to provide information about the spouse’s current or former health status as part of a health risk assessment in connection with a voluntary employer-sponsored wellness program so long as certain requirements are met.
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Filed under Genomic Policymaking, Genomics & Medicine, GINA, Legal & Regulatory, Privacy, Privacy, Privacy

NIH Refuses to March In—Again—And National Academies Challenge Human Subjects Regulation

The last few days have seen two significant news items from Washington. First, the National Institutes of Health have refused—yet again—to exercise their “march-in” rights to grant third-party licenses to a patented drug developed with federal funding. The drug in question is enzalutamide, a prostate cancer treatment marketed under the brand name Xtandi by Japanese pharmaceutical company Astellas Pharma. Xtandi was derived from federally supported research at UCLA. Under such circumstances, NIH has the statutory authority to grant a license to a third party if the grantee or its assignee “has not taken, or is not expected to take within a reasonable time effective steps to achieve practical application of the subject invention.” “Practical application” means that that the invention must be “available to the public on reasonable terms.”
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Filed under Legal & Regulatory, Patents & IP, Uncategorized