Update on Chadam v. Palo Alto Unified School District

About a year ago we reported on a case involving allegations of genetic discrimination by a school district in California. According to the allegations, in fall 2012 the Palo Alto Unified School District used genetic information regarding cystic fibrosis in deciding to transfer a student away from his neighborhood school to another school.

Genetic nondiscrimination laws are stronger in California than anywhere else in the United States. CalGINA (S.B. 559), which took effect five years ago, extended genetic nondiscrimination rights beyond the narrow scope of the federal statute known as GINA, the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008, which prohibits genetic discrimination in employment and health insurance contexts. However, this case was interesting to Genomics Law Report largely because the plaintiffs did not rely on CalGINA in their complaint against PAUSD but instead focused on protections against “perceived disability” provided under the Americans with Disabilities Act or ADA (42 U.S.C.A. §§12131 et seq.) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C.A. § 794). The school district had convinced a federal district court to dismiss the complaint, but the plaintiffs filed an appeal in January 2016.

• Previous coverage of CalGINA is available here
• Previous coverage of Chadam v. PAUSD is available here

What’s happened since the appeal was filed in January 2016?
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit heard arguments on October 19, 2016, and issued a decision on November 15, 2016. The court’s ruling overturned the district court’s dismissal of the ADA and Section 504 claims and remanded the case to the district court for further proceedings. While the court issued an unpublished judgment, which “is not precedent except as provided by Ninth Circuit Rule 36-3,” the plaintiffs’ attorney, Stephen R. Jaffe, publicly announced on LinkedIn that it was “a great victory for personal privacy.” The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals is allowing the ADA and Section 504 genetic discrimination claims to move forward, all based on the student’s genetic information being a “perceived disability.”

The court made its decision by determining that the district court erred in two ways. The first error was the district court’s finding that there was a “direct threat” defense available under the facts presented in the complaint. The school district had argued that it made its decision out of concern for the health or safety of other students at the school who do have cystic fibrosis and that it had made a reasonable judgment that the student posed a “direct threat” to those other students. According to the Ninth Circuit, the error in allowing a direct threat defense was twofold: (1) such a defense requires an individual assessment of the threat but, as per the facts in the complaint (which must be taken as true in evaluating a motion to dismiss), no such individual assessment was made; and (2) the school district’s decision that the student posed a direct threat was contrary to “reasonable judgment” with “best available objective evidence.” The district court’s second error was finding that the plaintiff had not shown the requisite intent to establish a claim for discrimination. Establishing a claim for discrimination, the Court of Appeals noted in its decision, does not require the plaintiff to show “bad motive, will, or animosity” or even an intent to cause harm. Rather, the action or decision to exclude someone categorically (e.g., because of protected class status) is “facial discrimination” and sufficient, even if no harm or injury was intended.

The case moves forward
The Ninth Circuit’s rejection of the motion to dismiss means that the case is back on track toward eventual trial. There are no apparent signs that the school district will settle the case. On December 21, 2016, the school district’s attorneys filed an answer to the amended complaint and raised a litany of affirmative defenses, including:

• failure to state a claim,
• lack of jurisdiction,
• lack of intent,
• immunity,
• defendant acted in conformity with law,
• equity (e.g., unclean hands and equitable estoppel),
• res judicata,
• statute of limitations,
• lack of standing,
• waiver/release,
• remedies not supported by claims, and
• no damages attributable to the defendant.

The defendant did not provide any details about these affirmative defenses to explain how or why they might be applicable. Because some affirmative defenses can be waived if not asserted, it is reasonable to treat these defenses for the moment as mere boilerplate—that is, inserted as a matter of lawyerly self-protection.

The court has ordered mediation to resume before March 14, 2017 and has since appointed a mediator to the case.

Keep this case on your watch list
Courts have never directly acknowledged a person’s genotype or carrier status as sufficient to pursue a “perceived disability” claim under the ADA or Section 504 protections against discrimination. A plaintiff’s victory would clarify (at least for people who live in the Ninth Circuit—CA, WA, OR, ID, MT, NV, AZ, AK, and HI) that those who are victims of genetic discrimination in areas of society other than employment or health insurance (the areas covered by GINA) are not left unprotected by federal law and are able to seek remedies under the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504.

The case is an important reminder that even if the PAUSD’s actions were permissible under federal law, state law (CalGINA) applicable at the time and applicable today prohibits school districts in California from using genetic information to make decisions about its students. The PAUSD’s decision to continue defending this case signals one or both of two things. The first is that defense attorneys believe that they can successfully slam the door on a broad ADA precedent that would allow “perceived disability” claims against those who discriminate based on genetic information. That seems somewhat unlikely, given the willingness of the Ninth Circuit to allow the case to proceed and the strength of the facts alleged by the plaintiff’s attorneys. The second is that the school district is focused solely on the money—either trying to minimize the size of any settlement or court award or trying to make sure an insurer is responsible for covering the payment of that settlement or award. Perhaps the PAUSD is showing its willingness to roll the dice if a reasonable court award is perceived as having a good chance of being substantially lower than any settlement amounts under consideration.

There has been very little public discussion of the case since initial interest when the appeal was filed last year. The plaintiff’s case has now survived a motion to dismiss, but the case has yet to be decided on the merits. For genetic rights advocates, this case should remain high on the watch list in 2017 with the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals poised to strengthen genetic nondiscrimination rights through ADA and Section 504 case law.

Filed under Genomic Policymaking, Genomics & Medicine, Genomics & Society, Pending Litigation, Privacy

FDA Issues Guidance for Next Generation Sequencing

On July 8, 2016, the FDA issued draft guidance on the subject of next generation sequencing (NGS) activities: (1) “Uses of Standards in FDA Regulatory Oversight of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS)-Based In Vitro Diagnostics (IVDs) Used for Diagnosing Germline Diseases” and (2) “Use of Public Human Genetic Variant Databases to Support Clinical Validity for Next Generation Sequencing (NGS)-Based In Vitro Diagnostics.” The first focuses on the FDA’s proposed use of standards to help establish the safety and efficacy of NGS-based tests. The second focuses on the importance of high quality and publicly accessible databases to provide robust scientific evidence for understanding genomic variation, to inform decision-making, and to assess the clinical validity of NGS-based tests. Guidance is not a formal regulation, but rather an agency’s statement about how it will interpret or apply a regulation in the future. Draft guidance is a proposed policy that means the agency is formulating a position, whereas a final guidance is a document that represents what the agency has settled on as its interpretive policy. In theory, guidance is intended to serve as additional instructions for complying with rules and not intended to serve as the rules themselves.

The premise underlying the draft guidance is the controversial and—as yet—legally untested assertion that genomic analyses of all kinds are “medical devices” that Congress has, by statute, authorized the FDA to regulate. If they are, then the FDA would have the power to bring them under its current risk-based classification scheme for medical devices or to create a new scheme for them. If they are not medical devices, then the effort to regulate them might exceed the FDA’s statutory authority and conceivably amount to an unconstitutional regulatory overreach. Both draft guidance documents avoid any mention of the overarching debate, a subject covered extensively on Genomics Law Report, surrounding FDA oversight of all laboratory developed tests (LDTs) and in vitro diagnostic multivariate index assays (IVDMIAs). As others have noted, it is impossible to consider these new pieces of draft guidance outside of that context. Nonetheless, even the FDA asserts (via Twitter and elsewhere) that the two new drafts are intended to facilitate the Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) and are distinct from the agency’s expressed intention to regulate LDTs. These pieces of draft guidance also give a policy-based reason for pause, as they could be another example of governance by guidance, a highly problematic approach as highlighted recently by John Conley with regard to the HIPAA right to access lab data and results.
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Filed under Badges, Direct-to-Consumer Services, FDA LDT Regulation, General Interest, Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomic Sequencing, Genomics & Medicine, Genomics & Society, Legal & Regulatory, Pending Regulation

The EEOC’s Final Rule on GINA and Employer-Sponsored Wellness Programs to Take Effect This Month

Gina name tagOn May 17, 2016, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which is the agency charged with enforcing Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA), issued a final rule changing how employers can set up incentives for the wellness programs they sponsor for their employees.

As previously reported on Genomics Law Report, on October 30, 2015 the EEOC had issued a proposed rule to amend the GINA regulations in an attempt to harmonize them with the Affordable Care Act’s promotion of employer wellness programs to lower health care costs. The EEOC indicated it had received more than 3000 public comments before the close of the comment period on January 28, 2016.

In short, the final rule allows employers to offer financial and in-kind incentives for an employee’s spouse to provide information about the spouse’s current or former health status as part of a health risk assessment in connection with a voluntary employer-sponsored wellness program so long as certain requirements are met.
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Filed under Genomic Policymaking, Genomics & Medicine, GINA, Legal & Regulatory, Privacy, Privacy, Privacy

Litigating the Accountability of Clinical Genomics Laboratories

Seeking Accountability from Clinical Genomics Laboratories

A wrongful death case pending in a federal court in Columbia, SC—Williams v. Quest Diagnostics, Inc., et al.—demonstrates the very high stakes involved with clinical genomics testing. The case also underscores the ongoing struggle to (1) establish accountability when mistakes happen and (2) establish a reasonable and effective level of governmental oversight for the laboratories performing such tests. The case could have dramatic implications for the future practice of genomic medicine, and regardless of how this specific case ultimately plays out in the courtroom, the allegations should serve as a serious wake up call to those involved in genomics for clinical purposes in any way.
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Filed under General Interest, Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomics & Medicine, Legal & Regulatory, Pending Litigation

Genetic information as “perceived disability”: Chadam v. PAUSD

Chadam v. PAUSD, as previously covered on Genomics Law Report, is a case in which parents of a school boy are alleging that a school district violated their son’s rights when it made the decision that it would transfer the boy to another school because of his genetic information. Specifically, the allegation is that when the boy moved to the area and registered for school, (1) the school district learned of the boy’s genetic information related to cystic fibrosis, (2)  the boy was regarded as disabled by the school district, and (3) on the basis of this perceived disability, the school district decided to transfer the boy to another school to protect two other students at the school who have cystic fibrosis. The school district’s decision was apparently based on the idea that the boy, because of his genetic markers, posed a cross-infection risk to the students with cystic fibrosis. Individuals with cystic fibrosis, because their respiratory symptoms create host environments favorable to microbiological pathogens, are often separated from one another to minimize risk of spreading germs to one another. Mere carriers of the genetic markers associated with cystic fibrosis do not pose such cross-infection risks.

This case unequivocally does not involve GINA, a federal nondiscrimination statute that has very limited scope and does not protect individuals from discrimination in education. While the facts alleged could have supported a clear claim for violation of California’s genetic nondiscrimination statute, CalGINA, which affords broader protections than the federal statute, the attorney for the Chadams did not raise that claim. Instead, this case alleges violations of two federal antidiscrimination statutes, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Title II of the ADA requires public education to be free from discrimination, and Section 504 requires all federally funded programs and activities to be free from discrimination. Under both provisions, individuals cannot be excluded from participating in or enjoying the benefits of education because of disability. The statutes protect three basic classes of individuals: (1) those who have a disability (i.e., those who have a physical or mental condition that substantially limits a major life activity); (2) those with a history or record of having a disability; and (3) those with a perceived disability (i.e., those “regarded as” having a disability). (For more information, see A Guide to Disability Rights Laws published by the Civil Rights Division of the US Department of Justice)

The plaintiffs in Chadam have appealed the trial court’s decision to grant the school district’s motion to dismiss the case (a Rule 12(b)(6) motion). In granting the school district’s motion, the court basically decided that even if it assumed all of the facts alleged by the plaintiffs to be true and drew all reasonable inferences in favor of the plaintiffs, there would not be a valid claim upon which relief could be granted. On appeal, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, which covers California, will focus on whether the district court erred in reaching that decision. The court of appeals will consider the motion de novo—that is, will give no deference to the trial court’s decision—and determine whether the facts alleged in the pleadings, when read in the light most favorable to the plantiffs, state a claim for relief that is plausible. The amicus brief filed by the United States (Department of Justice and Department of Education) urges the Ninth Circuit to reverse the district court’s decision and remand the case, stating that the plaintiffs have alleged sufficient facts to support a claim of intentional discrimination under Title II of the ADA and Section 504.

Is there judicial precedent for ADA protection of genetic information?

About 15 years ago, long before Congress passed the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, there was a case in which individuals sought ADA protection from genetic discrimination. That case involved the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad (BNSF), which allegedly had been using employees’ genetic information in connection with work-related carpal tunnel syndrome claims. The case was never decided by a court, however. In 2001 the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and BNSF settled the EEOC’s request for injunctive relief to stop the company’s genetic testing, and in 2002 the EEOC and BNSF settled the request for damages with an agreement to compensate individuals with up to $2.2 million. While the settlement agreement was subject to approval by the Eastern District of Wisconsin (see 2002 WL 32155386), this case did not set judicial precedent that the ADA protects individuals from decisions based on genetic information.

Does the relevant legislative history suggest that individuals are protected from genetic discrimination because of “perceived disability”?

To answer this question, it is useful to start with legal scholar Mark Rothstein’s thorough 1992 analysis of the law regarding genetic discrimination and possible protection under the ADA as it existed at that time. See Mark A. Rothstein, Genetic Discrimination in Employment and the Americans with Disabilities Act, 29 Hous. L. Rev. 23 (1992).

In the early 1990s, in a letter to a Congressional committee chair, the EEOC actually rejected the idea that the ADA prohibits genetic discrimination against asymptomatic individuals, instead taking the position that the ADA would only protect an individual once the condition existed and symptoms were present. The EEOC’s technical assistance manual in 1992 also noted that genetic predisposition and family history are not “impairments” protected by the ADA. Nearly 10 years later, following the issuance of the Executive Order 13145 in 2000 that protects federal employees from genetic discrimination, the EEOC provided guidance indicating that instances of disparate treatment on the basis of genetic test results or family medical history would support a claim that an individual was “regarded as” having a disability and thus protected under the ADA and Rehabilitation Act.

As a matter of history, Congress and advocates alike did not believe that the ADA or Section 504 were sufficient to protect individuals from genetic nondiscrimination. In the statutory text of GINA, Congress found, “Federal law addressing genetic discrimination…is incomplete in both the scope and depth of its protections.” (PL 110-233, Finding 5).

To date, there are no direct cases on point deciding that genetic information is a “perceived disability” under the ADA and Section 504 or, conversely, ruling out that possibility.

What are the implications of this case?

Ultimately, a broad ruling in Chadam that genetic information alone is a sufficient basis to bring an action for “perceived disability” could dramatically expand individual genetic nondiscrimination protection—at least in the Ninth Circuit. Courts in other federal circuits would not be bound by a Ninth Circuit decision and could choose whether or not to follow it. That reality, combined with the strong public reactions to this case, suggests that Congress has important work to do to strengthen genetic nondiscrimination protections in education and other sectors of society currently not addressed directly by federal statutes.

Filed under Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomic Policymaking, Genomics & Society, GINA, Pending Litigation

The Patent Dispute Over Gene Editing Technologies: The Broad Institute, Inc. vs. The Regents of the University of California

CRISPR-Cas9 editing of the genomeThe patent dispute already called “the biggest in biotech history” is only getting started. On January 11, 2016, Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) Deborah Katz officially declared an interference over patents for the CRISPR-Cas gene editing technologies. An interference is a U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) administrative proceeding conducted to determine which of multiple claimants to a particular invention has priority rights. Since the patents in question were filed before the March 2013 effective date of the America Invents Act, priority will be awarded to the claimant who was the first to invent the technology in question. This dispute pits Feng Zhang, the Broad Institute, and MIT against Jennifer Doudna and the University of California-Berkeley as well as Emmanuelle Charpentier, Krzysztof Chylinski, and the University of Vienna. Law professor Jacob S. Sherkow has followed the case closely and has provided useful background information on Stanford’s Law and Biosciences Blog.
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Filed under Genomics & Society, Legal & Regulatory, Patent Litigation, Patents & IP, Pending Litigation

Genetic Discrimination Case Against School District is Appealed to Ninth Circuit

classroom-1534186As Stephanie M. Lee reported for Buzzfeed in a well-written account (which contains links to the relevant court documents), an appeal was filed in January with the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in the case of Chadam v. Palo Alto Unified School District (4:13-CV-04129-CW). At issue in the case is whether the school district violated a boy’s rights when it decided to force him to transfer schools. The student’s parents allege the transfer decision was because he is a carrier of a genetic variant associated with Cystic Fibrosis or CF (although he has not exhibited symptoms of the disease), and the appeal argues the trial court erred in dismissing the complaint that the school district’s decision to transfer violated his rights under Title II of the American’s with Disabilities Act or ADA (42 U.S.C.A. §12131 et seq.), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C.A. § 794), and the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. At the trial court level, the school district successfully defended its decision to transfer the boy by arguing it relied on medical advice and made the decision in an attempt to protect other children at the school who have CF.
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Filed under Badges, Genomics & Medicine, Genomics & Society, GINA, Privacy

EEOC Tries to Harmonize ACA’s Promotion of Employer Wellness Programs with GINA’s Ban Against Employer Access to Genetic Information of Employees and Employees’ Family Members

Gina name tagThe Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is responsible for enforcing Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA), which prohibits employers from requesting genetic information (defined broadly) from their prospective, current, or former employees. GINA contains only six limited exceptions to this prohibition, one of which is an exception for wellness programs in which the employee’s participation is voluntary.

On October 30, 2015 the EEOC issued a proposed rule to amend GINA regulations in an attempt to harmonize them with the Affordable Care Act’s promotion of employer wellness programs to lower health care costs.
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Filed under Badges, General Interest, GINA, Legal & Regulatory, Privacy, Privacy, Privacy

Australia revokes Myriad’s three patent claims on isolated BRCA1 DNA

genome sequenceIn a decision issued on October 7, 2015, the High Court of Australia (High Court) ruled unanimously in D’Arcy v. Myriad Genetics Inc., [2015] HCA 35, that three BRCA1 patent claims held by Myriad Genetics, Inc. under Australian Patent 686,004 were invalid. While Myriad’s patent had actually expired on August 11, 2015, the court decision set important precedent relevant to intellectual property in genetics/omics and precision medicine.

The D’Arcy case itself, along with other litigation in the U.S. involving Myriad’s gene patents, has been discussed previously on Genomics Law Report (See generally here). Mutations in the BRCA1 gene confer increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. The Myriad scientists were first to clone and sequence BRCA1, the gene that Mary-Claire King had linked to cancer susceptibility in a landmark paper in Science in 1990. Myriad identified several BRCA1 mutations. Myriad’s Australian Patent 686,004 contains 30 separate claims. Yvonne D’Arcy challenged the validity of the first three claims in Myriad’s patent, which claimed the isolated BRCA1 sequences with mutations conferring increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer.
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Filed under Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomics & Medicine, Legal & Regulatory, Myriad Gene Patent Litigation, Patent Litigation, Patents & IP

Groundhog Day: FDA and Proposed Oversight of LDTs

FDA v LDTOnce again, attention in Washington, DC has turned to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and its proposed oversight of all laboratory developed tests (LDTs). The occasion for this attention was the FDA’s separate releases on October 3, 2014 of its proposed LDT framework and proposed notification and medical device reporting guidance. The former describes the basic structure for how the FDA intends to exercise its authority over LDTs as medical devices (e.g., risk classification and enforcement discretion categories), and the latter describes the process by which laboratories offering LDTs must notify the FDA of all LDTs (i.e., registration) and the adverse event reporting requirements that would apply to LDTs as medical devices (i.e., reporting of deaths, serious injuries, malfunctions, etc.). The agency hosted a public meeting on January 8-9, 2015 to discuss the proposed guidance and is accepting written public comments until February 2, 2015. [No joke: Comments are, in fact, due on Groundhog Day.]

• Comments on the proposed LDT framework (Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0360) can be submitted here.
• Comments on the proposed notification and medical device reporting (Docket No. FDA-2011-D-0357) can be submitted here.

The public meeting featuring speakers and panelists was organized into six topical sessions covering test components and labeling; clinical validity and intended use; categories for continued enforcement discretion; notification and adverse event reporting; classification and prioritization; and quality system regulation. The FDA has promised to post the transcript (and, in the meantime, some live tweets from the meeting will remain available on @DNAlawyer’s feed). Dr. Jeff Shuren started the meeting with a reminder that the FDA’s proposed guidance was based on discussions held five years ago, in 2010. (Prior GLR coverage is here.)
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Filed under Badges, FDA LDT Regulation, Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomic Policymaking, Genomics & Medicine, Pending Regulation