Patents & IP

New Federal Trade Secret Act and Its Impact on Life Sciences

918333_u_s__capitol_buildingOn May 11, 2016, a new federal trade secrets law called the Defend Trade Secrets Act (DTSA) took effect. Its primary impact is to allow the victims of trade secret misappropriation to sue in federal court. It also provides some new civil remedies that exceed what is usually available under state law. The DTSA will be slotted into the U.S. Criminal Code (chapter 90 of Title 18), which already makes industrial espionage and trade secret theft a federal crime. In terms of what companies have to do to comply, the answer is almost nothing—the sole exception being a change in future employee contracts that is discussed below. In this post I’ll describe and analyze the new law and offer some thoughts about its potential impact on the life sciences industry.

Until now, civil trade secret protection has been entirely a matter of state law. The law is very consistent from state to state, as 47 states have enacted the Uniform Trade Secrets Act (UTSA). The exceptions are New York, Massachusetts, and North Carolina, though the North Carolina statute is generally similar to UTSA. Enforcement actions must usually be brought in state court, though federal courts can take jurisdiction if the plaintiff and defendant are citizens of different states. Even then, however, the federal court must apply state law in deciding the case.
Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off on New Federal Trade Secret Act and Its Impact on Life Sciences
Filed under Direct-to-Consumer Services, Genetic Testing/Screening, Patent Litigation, Patents & IP

NIH Refuses to March In—Again—And National Academies Challenge Human Subjects Regulation

The last few days have seen two significant news items from Washington. First, the National Institutes of Health have refused—yet again—to exercise their “march-in” rights to grant third-party licenses to a patented drug developed with federal funding. The drug in question is enzalutamide, a prostate cancer treatment marketed under the brand name Xtandi by Japanese pharmaceutical company Astellas Pharma. Xtandi was derived from federally supported research at UCLA. Under such circumstances, NIH has the statutory authority to grant a license to a third party if the grantee or its assignee “has not taken, or is not expected to take within a reasonable time effective steps to achieve practical application of the subject invention.” “Practical application” means that that the invention must be “available to the public on reasonable terms.”
Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off on NIH Refuses to March In—Again—And National Academies Challenge Human Subjects Regulation
Filed under Legal & Regulatory, Patents & IP, Uncategorized

ACLU v. Myriad Genetics, Round 2: The Problem of Governance-by-Guidance

MyriadJust about everyone interested enough in genomics and the law to read this post will know that the American Civil Liberties Union waged a long and ultimately successful legal campaign to invalidate Myriad Genetics’ patent claims to isolated BRCA genes, mutations of which are linked to breast and ovarian cancer. Now the ACLU has launched a second front, this time attacking Myriad’s post-patent business model of maintaining its vast and unique database of genotype-phenotype associations as a trade secret. GLR reported on that evolving strategy two years ago.

The new ACLU attack has, thus far, received modest attention in the scientific press, and some of what has been reported is inaccurate. In this post I will briefly review what has actually happened and then try to sort out fact from fiction in the reportage. The bottom line is that the federal government has not created new stealth regulations dealing with the disclosure of genomic data to patients. It has, however, used the practice of governance-by-guidance to make significant new policy, which is problematic enough in its own right.
Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off on ACLU v. Myriad Genetics, Round 2: The Problem of Governance-by-Guidance
Filed under Genomic Policymaking, Genomics & Society, Myriad Gene Patent Litigation, Patent Litigation, Patents & IP, Pending Litigation

The Patent Dispute Over Gene Editing Technologies: The Broad Institute, Inc. vs. The Regents of the University of California

CRISPR-Cas9 editing of the genomeThe patent dispute already called “the biggest in biotech history” is only getting started. On January 11, 2016, Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) Deborah Katz officially declared an interference over patents for the CRISPR-Cas gene editing technologies. An interference is a U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) administrative proceeding conducted to determine which of multiple claimants to a particular invention has priority rights. Since the patents in question were filed before the March 2013 effective date of the America Invents Act, priority will be awarded to the claimant who was the first to invent the technology in question. This dispute pits Feng Zhang, the Broad Institute, and MIT against Jennifer Doudna and the University of California-Berkeley as well as Emmanuelle Charpentier, Krzysztof Chylinski, and the University of Vienna. Law professor Jacob S. Sherkow has followed the case closely and has provided useful background information on Stanford’s Law and Biosciences Blog.
Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off on The Patent Dispute Over Gene Editing Technologies: The Broad Institute, Inc. vs. The Regents of the University of California
Filed under Genomics & Society, Legal & Regulatory, Patent Litigation, Patents & IP, Pending Litigation

Australia revokes Myriad’s three patent claims on isolated BRCA1 DNA

genome sequenceIn a decision issued on October 7, 2015, the High Court of Australia (High Court) ruled unanimously in D’Arcy v. Myriad Genetics Inc., [2015] HCA 35, that three BRCA1 patent claims held by Myriad Genetics, Inc. under Australian Patent 686,004 were invalid. While Myriad’s patent had actually expired on August 11, 2015, the court decision set important precedent relevant to intellectual property in genetics/omics and precision medicine.

The D’Arcy case itself, along with other litigation in the U.S. involving Myriad’s gene patents, has been discussed previously on Genomics Law Report (See generally here). Mutations in the BRCA1 gene confer increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. The Myriad scientists were first to clone and sequence BRCA1, the gene that Mary-Claire King had linked to cancer susceptibility in a landmark paper in Science in 1990. Myriad identified several BRCA1 mutations. Myriad’s Australian Patent 686,004 contains 30 separate claims. Yvonne D’Arcy challenged the validity of the first three claims in Myriad’s patent, which claimed the isolated BRCA1 sequences with mutations conferring increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer.
Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off on Australia revokes Myriad’s three patent claims on isolated BRCA1 DNA
Filed under Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomics & Medicine, Legal & Regulatory, Myriad Gene Patent Litigation, Patent Litigation, Patents & IP

Are Software Patents Dead?—Alice’s Implications for Life Sciences

Not too long ago, getting patents on software and business methods was all the rage. And concern about their effects was profound. In fact, in 2003 I spoke at a Federal Reserve Bank conference devoted to the question of whether such patents were an existential threat to the financial industry. Now, after a series of Supreme Court cases that brought about a dramatic shift in the approach taken by the lower courts and the Patent Office, the question is whether those patents are still alive. The answer is that they are, but barely, and their prognosis is bad.

Do these developments matter to people in the life sciences? The answer is a resounding yes. If we then ask why software patentability matters, the answer is that life sciences are increasingly focused on software-dependent data analysis.

These points were brought home to me when I spoke at another, more recent conference—the Bio-IT World Conference in Boston this past April.
Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off on Are Software Patents Dead?—Alice’s Implications for Life Sciences
Filed under Bioinformatics/IT, Industry News, Legal & Regulatory, Patent Litigation, Patents & IP

Australian appeals court upholds patents on isolated BRCA1 DNA

Robert Cook-Deegan, MD

Bob Cook-Deegan 0546.05 © Duke University Photography Jim WallaceOn September 5, the Federal Court of Australia (the appeals court) upheld a claim on isolated DNA from the BRCA1 gene. It dismissed Yvonne D’Arcy’s appeal of a case that has attracted international attention. Australian patent 686,004 has never been enforced, so the court decision has little real-world concrete impact. As Richard Gold and Julia Carbone explained in their classic case study, “Myriad Genetics: In the Eye of the Policy Storm,” the patent rights on BRCA1 and BRCA2 were exclusively licensed for use in Australia and New Zealand to Genetic Technologies, Ltd. (GTG), which in turn made them a “gift to the people of Australia.” When the CEO of GTG proposed taking back that gift in the summer of 2008, he provoked a firestorm and the company backed down in October, restating that it would not enforce its patent rights against laboratories offering BRCA testing. The Australian Senate held a series of hearings, and a bill proscribing DNA sequence patents was proposed, but the new government opposed it, and it lapsed. Instead, Australia enacted patent reforms in 2012 that raised the bar for utility and clarified the Australian law’s exemption from infringement liability for research and regulatory approval. Most of the provisions of that law took effect on April 15, 2013, the very day Association for Molecular Pathology v Myriad Genetics (AMP v Myriad) was argued before the U.S. Supreme Court.


Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off on Australian appeals court upholds patents on isolated BRCA1 DNA
Filed under Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomic Sequencing, Genomics & Medicine, Genomics & Society, International Developments, International News, Legal & Regulatory, Myriad Gene Patent Litigation, Patent Litigation, Patents & IP

Property Rights and the Human Body

11808967A Canadian court made headlines this month when it decided, as a preliminary matter, that human tissue removed from the body for diagnostic medical tests is “personal property” that belongs to the hospital where the procedure was performed. The case was a medical negligence action brought against two doctors by the estate of Snezana Piljak, a woman who was diagnosed in 2009 with colorectal cancer and died in 2011. At issue in the case is whether the doctors were negligent in failing to diagnose the cancer in 2008 when a colonoscopy was performed on Ms. Piljak. The doctors had petitioned the Canadian court for access to liver tissue biopsied from Ms. Piljak in 2009 at Toronto’s Stonybrook Hospital. The court had to address the matter of tissue ownership before it could consider whether the defendant-doctors had a right to access the liver tissue in order to investigate whether Ms. Piljak had hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC or Lynch Syndrome). If the HNPCC were indicated by an examination of the tissue, the defendant-doctors would use that fact to mount a defense against the accusations of negligence. The court ruled that the tissue was personal property of the hospital (though it ultimately denied the defendant-doctors’ request to examine it for technical reasons). The decision that human tissue is “personal property” has important legal ramifications that might affect the biotech industry and genetic research community outside of Canada. The question of ownership of biospecimens has often been tangled up with the status of the biospecimens as personal property, though they are distinct questions.
Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off on Property Rights and the Human Body
Filed under Biobanking, Genomics & Medicine, Genomics & Society, Patents & IP, Privacy

District Court Denies Myriad’s Preliminary Injunction Against Ambry

MyriadIn a 106-page opinion issued on March 10, 2014, Judge Robert Shelby of the federal district court in Salt Lake City denied Myriad Genetics’ Motion for Preliminary Injunction in its lawsuit against Ambry Genetics Corporation. For reasons I’ll try to explain, this is a significant development from a practical standpoint, but not earth-shaking from a legal point of view. Above all, it is not surprising. Reluctant as I am to say “I told you so,” well, I told you so.

As we previously reported, after the Supreme Court decided AMP v. Myriad Genetics, a number of competitors, including Ambry, jumped into the BRCA testing market. Myriad started suing them in the Utah federal district court, beginning with Ambry (filed July 9, 2013) and Gene by Gene (July 10). The cases were soon consolidated, to be handled together by Judge Shelby. In both cases, Myriad alleged that the defendant’s testing would infringe patent claims that had not been struck down by the Supreme Court’s AMP decision, which had held that DNA that had merely been isolated from the body was not patentable subject matter. In both cases, Myriad sought a preliminary injunction: a pre-trial order that the defendant must cease its testing activity for the duration of the case. If Myriad then prevailed at trial, the injunction would become permanent. The defendants denied Myriad’s allegations, opposed the preliminary injunction, and filed massive antitrust counterclaims alleging that Myriad has used its patents in unlawful ways to monopolize the BRCA testing market.
Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off on District Court Denies Myriad’s Preliminary Injunction Against Ambry
Filed under Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomics & Medicine, Genomics & Society, Myriad Gene Patent Litigation, Patent Litigation, Patents & IP, Pending Litigation, Pending Regulation

Designing Children

With this post the GLR introduces a new Contributing Writer, Jonathan Webber. Jonathan is a web editor at Robinson, Bradshaw & Hinson, the law firm that sponsors the GLR. His duties include copy-editing the GLR. That exposure, together with his background in anthropology—he came to RBH with a degree in anthropology and experience as both a field archaeologist and cultural educator for a state park system—has sparked his interest in some of the cultural and ethical issues that genomics raises. In this first post he brings his perspective to bear on the implications of 23andMe’s “designer babies” patent, and we look forward to more of his insight in the future.

By the way, some readers may detect a growing anthropological conspiracy: I’m an anthropologist, as is Contributing Editor Jen Wagner, and now Jonathan. Yes, we’re taking over.
Enjoy—
John Conley
GLR Editor

Copy of 02_03828_va_mao_posters_02_225

The September 24, 2013 grant of a patent to 23andMe for “gamete donor selection based on genetic calculations” has stirred another round of controversy about “designer babies.” Predictably, the press and blogosphere lit up with condemnations of both 23andMe and the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Karen Kaplan of the Los Angeles Times writes that the patent itself is “even more repulsive than the idea of using DNA tests to help people create designer babies.” Dov Fox of the University of San Diego School of Law suggests that “Congress should consider amending the patent law to appoint ‘ethics representatives’ to the PTO.” Sigrid Sterckx, et al., writing in Genetics in Medicine, note that the PTO did not “question whether techniques for facilitating the ‘design’ of future human babies were appropriate subject matter for a patent.”

So, while some ire has been and will be directed at 23andMe itself, commentators are also raising larger questions about patent eligibility and the patent application process.
Read the rest of this entry »

Comments Off on Designing Children
Filed under Direct-to-Consumer Services, Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomics & Society, Patents & IP