ACLU v. Myriad Genetics: Defendants Move to Dismiss

The US Patent and Trademark Office, the University of Utah and Myriad Genetics have all filed motions seeking to dismiss the ACLU’s high-profile lawsuit attacking the patentability of genes (pdfs: USPTO Memorandum; Myriad/Utah Memorandum). In alleging that the plaintiffs lack standing to bring the lawsuit — a common procedural tactic in litigation — Myriad does not mince words, opening its argument as follows:

This case is a thinly veiled attempt to challenge the validity of patents where, other than an overall policy disagreement concerning the legitimacy of gene patents, the plaintiffs have no actual dispute with the Defendants over patent infringement. If the plaintiffs in this case have standing, then virtually anyone can challenge any patent at any time.

The ACLU has yet to publicly comment on the motions to dismiss. The court is scheduled to hear the Motion to Dismiss (pdf) on August 26th.

Filed under: Badges, Genetic Testing/Screening, Myriad Gene Patent Litigation, Patents & IP, Pending Litigation
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Trackbacks

Check out what others are saying about this post...
  1. […] Utah and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). In late July, Myriad and its co-defendants filed motions to dismiss the lawsuit. Yesterday, Judge Robert W. Sweet of the Southern District of New York finally denied those […]