Genetic information as “perceived disability”: Chadam v. PAUSD

Chadam v. PAUSD, as previously covered on Genomics Law Report, is a case in which parents of a school boy are alleging that a school district violated their son’s rights when it made the decision that it would transfer the boy to another school because of his genetic information. Specifically, the allegation is that when the boy moved to the area and registered for school, (1) the school district learned of the boy’s genetic information related to cystic fibrosis, (2)  the boy was regarded as disabled by the school district, and (3) on the basis of this perceived disability, the school district decided to transfer the boy to another school to protect two other students at the school who have cystic fibrosis. The school district’s decision was apparently based on the idea that the boy, because of his genetic markers, posed a cross-infection risk to the students with cystic fibrosis. Individuals with cystic fibrosis, because their respiratory symptoms create host environments favorable to microbiological pathogens, are often separated from one another to minimize risk of spreading germs to one another. Mere carriers of the genetic markers associated with cystic fibrosis do not pose such cross-infection risks.
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Filed under Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomic Policymaking, Genomics & Society, GINA, Pending Litigation

The Patent Dispute Over Gene Editing Technologies: The Broad Institute, Inc. vs. The Regents of the University of California

CRISPR-Cas9 editing of the genomeThe patent dispute already called “the biggest in biotech history” is only getting started. On January 11, 2016, Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) Deborah Katz officially declared an interference over patents for the CRISPR-Cas gene editing technologies. An interference is a U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) administrative proceeding conducted to determine which of multiple claimants to a particular invention has priority rights. Since the patents in question were filed before the March 2013 effective date of the America Invents Act, priority will be awarded to the claimant who was the first to invent the technology in question. This dispute pits Feng Zhang, the Broad Institute, and MIT against Jennifer Doudna and the University of California-Berkeley as well as Emmanuelle Charpentier, Krzysztof Chylinski, and the University of Vienna. Law professor Jacob S. Sherkow has followed the case closely and has provided useful background information on Stanford’s Law and Biosciences Blog.
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Filed under Genomics & Society, Legal & Regulatory, Patent Litigation, Patents & IP, Pending Litigation

Genetic Discrimination Case Against School District is Appealed to Ninth Circuit

classroom-1534186As Stephanie M. Lee reported for Buzzfeed in a well-written account (which contains links to the relevant court documents), an appeal was filed in January with the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in the case of Chadam v. Palo Alto Unified School District (4:13-CV-04129-CW). At issue in the case is whether the school district violated a boy’s rights when it decided to force him to transfer schools. The student’s parents allege the transfer decision was because he is a carrier of a genetic variant associated with Cystic Fibrosis or CF (although he has not exhibited symptoms of the disease), and the appeal argues the trial court erred in dismissing the complaint that the school district’s decision to transfer violated his rights under Title II of the American’s with Disabilities Act or ADA (42 U.S.C.A. §12131 et seq.), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C.A. § 794), and the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. At the trial court level, the school district successfully defended its decision to transfer the boy by arguing it relied on medical advice and made the decision in an attempt to protect other children at the school who have CF.
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Filed under Badges, Genomics & Medicine, Genomics & Society, GINA, Privacy