Genomics & Medicine

Some Thoughts on the New Common Rule for Human Subjects Research

On January 18, 2017, in one of its last official acts, the outgoing Obama administration issued a final revised version of the Common Rule—the regulation that governs the treatment of human subjects in all federally funded research. This was the culmination of a process that began in 2011 when the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) issued an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, or ANPRM, that envisioned major changes to the original 1991 Common Rule. Then, on September 8, 2015, HHS and 15 other federal departments and agencies released a Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) that proposed specific changes to the Common Rule and opened a 90-day public comment period.
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Filed under Genomics & Medicine, Informed Consent, Patents & IP

Williams v. Athena Motion to Dismiss Hearing—SC Supreme Court May Be Asked to Decide Whether a Diagnostic Laboratory Qualifies as a Healthcare Provider

Foreword by John Conley 

Back on May 31, 2016, Contributing Editor Jennifer Wagner wrote a lengthy report on the newly filed case of Williams v. Quest Diagnostics, et al. As Jen recounted, plaintiff Amy Williams sued Athena Diagnostics and its corporate parent, Quest Diagnostics, alleging that Athena negligently misclassified a genetic variant it identified in testing the DNA of her late son. Ms. Williams claims that the misclassification caused the boy’s doctors to prescribe a potentially dangerous course of treatment that ultimately led to his death. The case was originally filed in a South Carolina state court and was then removed to federal court by the defendants, which they were able to do because the parties are citizens of different states.
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Filed under General Interest, Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomics & Medicine, Legal & Regulatory, Pending Litigation

Update on Chadam v. Palo Alto Unified School District

About a year ago we reported on a case involving allegations of genetic discrimination by a school district in California. According to the allegations, in fall 2012 the Palo Alto Unified School District used genetic information regarding cystic fibrosis in deciding to transfer a student away from his neighborhood school to another school.

Genetic nondiscrimination laws are stronger in California than anywhere else in the United States. CalGINA (S.B. 559), which took effect five years ago, extended genetic nondiscrimination rights beyond the narrow scope of the federal statute known as GINA, the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008, which prohibits genetic discrimination in employment and health insurance contexts. However, this case was interesting to Genomics Law Report largely because the plaintiffs did not rely on CalGINA in their complaint against PAUSD but instead focused on protections against “perceived disability” provided under the Americans with Disabilities Act or ADA (42 U.S.C.A. §§12131 et seq.) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C.A. § 794). The school district had convinced a federal district court to dismiss the complaint, but the plaintiffs filed an appeal in January 2016.
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Filed under Genomic Policymaking, Genomics & Medicine, Genomics & Society, Pending Litigation, Privacy

FDA Issues Guidance for Next Generation Sequencing

On July 8, 2016, the FDA issued draft guidance on the subject of next generation sequencing (NGS) activities: (1) “Uses of Standards in FDA Regulatory Oversight of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS)-Based In Vitro Diagnostics (IVDs) Used for Diagnosing Germline Diseases” and (2) “Use of Public Human Genetic Variant Databases to Support Clinical Validity for Next Generation Sequencing (NGS)-Based In Vitro Diagnostics.” The first focuses on the FDA’s proposed use of standards to help establish the safety and efficacy of NGS-based tests. The second focuses on the importance of high quality and publicly accessible databases to provide robust scientific evidence for understanding genomic variation, to inform decision-making, and to assess the clinical validity of NGS-based tests. Guidance is not a formal regulation, but rather an agency’s statement about how it will interpret or apply a regulation in the future. Draft guidance is a proposed policy that means the agency is formulating a position, whereas a final guidance is a document that represents what the agency has settled on as its interpretive policy. In theory, guidance is intended to serve as additional instructions for complying with rules and not intended to serve as the rules themselves.

The premise underlying the draft guidance is the controversial and—as yet—legally untested assertion that genomic analyses of all kinds are “medical devices” that Congress has, by statute, authorized the FDA to regulate. If they are, then the FDA would have the power to bring them under its current risk-based classification scheme for medical devices or to create a new scheme for them. If they are not medical devices, then the effort to regulate them might exceed the FDA’s statutory authority and conceivably amount to an unconstitutional regulatory overreach. Both draft guidance documents avoid any mention of the overarching debate, a subject covered extensively on Genomics Law Report, surrounding FDA oversight of all laboratory developed tests (LDTs) and in vitro diagnostic multivariate index assays (IVDMIAs). As others have noted, it is impossible to consider these new pieces of draft guidance outside of that context. Nonetheless, even the FDA asserts (via Twitter and elsewhere) that the two new drafts are intended to facilitate the Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI) and are distinct from the agency’s expressed intention to regulate LDTs. These pieces of draft guidance also give a policy-based reason for pause, as they could be another example of governance by guidance, a highly problematic approach as highlighted recently by John Conley with regard to the HIPAA right to access lab data and results.
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Filed under Badges, Direct-to-Consumer Services, FDA LDT Regulation, General Interest, Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomic Sequencing, Genomics & Medicine, Genomics & Society, Legal & Regulatory, Pending Regulation

The EEOC’s Final Rule on GINA and Employer-Sponsored Wellness Programs to Take Effect This Month

Gina name tagOn May 17, 2016, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which is the agency charged with enforcing Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA), issued a final rule changing how employers can set up incentives for the wellness programs they sponsor for their employees.

As previously reported on Genomics Law Report, on October 30, 2015 the EEOC had issued a proposed rule to amend the GINA regulations in an attempt to harmonize them with the Affordable Care Act’s promotion of employer wellness programs to lower health care costs. The EEOC indicated it had received more than 3000 public comments before the close of the comment period on January 28, 2016.

In short, the final rule allows employers to offer financial and in-kind incentives for an employee’s spouse to provide information about the spouse’s current or former health status as part of a health risk assessment in connection with a voluntary employer-sponsored wellness program so long as certain requirements are met.
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Filed under Genomic Policymaking, Genomics & Medicine, GINA, Legal & Regulatory, Privacy, Privacy, Privacy

Cleveland Clinic Pathologist Urges Contract Solution for Return of Genomic Data

The Cleveland Clinic’s Roger Klein responds to my previous GLR post:

Roger-Klein-MD-JDThe Office of Civil Rights’ interpretation of the requirements of 45 CFR § 164 could pose problems for clinical laboratories and the professionals who practice within them. Although the issue of providing benign variants for a single gene, at least prospectively, would be straightforward, a broad definition of the designated medical record set could result in considerable complexity when one considers large-scale sequencing. Some excluded data can be of variable reliability, may be prospectively filtered by software, or may otherwise be omitted from the patient report because of professional interpretation and judgment. One can legitimately argue that this interpretation and judgment, as reflected in the patient report, should serve as the gateway to the official medical record.
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Filed under Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomic Sequencing, Genomics & Medicine, Genomics & Society

Litigating the Accountability of Clinical Genomics Laboratories

Seeking Accountability from Clinical Genomics Laboratories

A wrongful death case pending in a federal court in Columbia, SC—Williams v. Quest Diagnostics, Inc., et al.—demonstrates the very high stakes involved with clinical genomics testing. The case also underscores the ongoing struggle to (1) establish accountability when mistakes happen and (2) establish a reasonable and effective level of governmental oversight for the laboratories performing such tests. The case could have dramatic implications for the future practice of genomic medicine, and regardless of how this specific case ultimately plays out in the courtroom, the allegations should serve as a serious wake up call to those involved in genomics for clinical purposes in any way.
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Filed under General Interest, Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomics & Medicine, Legal & Regulatory, Pending Litigation

Genetic Discrimination Case Against School District is Appealed to Ninth Circuit

classroom-1534186As Stephanie M. Lee reported for Buzzfeed in a well-written account (which contains links to the relevant court documents), an appeal was filed in January with the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in the case of Chadam v. Palo Alto Unified School District (4:13-CV-04129-CW). At issue in the case is whether the school district violated a boy’s rights when it decided to force him to transfer schools. The student’s parents allege the transfer decision was because he is a carrier of a genetic variant associated with Cystic Fibrosis or CF (although he has not exhibited symptoms of the disease), and the appeal argues the trial court erred in dismissing the complaint that the school district’s decision to transfer violated his rights under Title II of the American’s with Disabilities Act or ADA (42 U.S.C.A. §12131 et seq.), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C.A. § 794), and the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. At the trial court level, the school district successfully defended its decision to transfer the boy by arguing it relied on medical advice and made the decision in an attempt to protect other children at the school who have CF.
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Filed under Badges, Genomics & Medicine, Genomics & Society, GINA, Privacy

Australia revokes Myriad’s three patent claims on isolated BRCA1 DNA

genome sequenceIn a decision issued on October 7, 2015, the High Court of Australia (High Court) ruled unanimously in D’Arcy v. Myriad Genetics Inc., [2015] HCA 35, that three BRCA1 patent claims held by Myriad Genetics, Inc. under Australian Patent 686,004 were invalid. While Myriad’s patent had actually expired on August 11, 2015, the court decision set important precedent relevant to intellectual property in genetics/omics and precision medicine.

The D’Arcy case itself, along with other litigation in the U.S. involving Myriad’s gene patents, has been discussed previously on Genomics Law Report (See generally here). Mutations in the BRCA1 gene confer increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer. The Myriad scientists were first to clone and sequence BRCA1, the gene that Mary-Claire King had linked to cancer susceptibility in a landmark paper in Science in 1990. Myriad identified several BRCA1 mutations. Myriad’s Australian Patent 686,004 contains 30 separate claims. Yvonne D’Arcy challenged the validity of the first three claims in Myriad’s patent, which claimed the isolated BRCA1 sequences with mutations conferring increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer.
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Filed under Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomics & Medicine, Legal & Regulatory, Myriad Gene Patent Litigation, Patent Litigation, Patents & IP

Conley Q & A on LDTs and the FDA

FDA v LDTIn her recent post on the FDA’s draft guidance on its proposed oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests (LDTs), Jen Wagner mentioned my interview with Genome Web’s Turna Ray on January 15, 2015. Turna asked me to address some arguments made in a “white paper” written by former U.S. Solicitor General Paul Clement and Harvard law professor Laurence Tribe on behalf of their client, the American Clinical Laboratory Association. The main point that Clement and Tribe made was that the FDA lacks legal authority to oversee LDTs, at least in the way that it’s proposing to do so. As I told Turna, I don’t necessarily disagree with their position; in fact, I’m skeptical about the FDA’s authority to do this. Also, like Jen, I’m not persuaded the proposed FDA initiative is likely to work well from a practical perspective. Nonetheless, I agreed to play along in a devil’s advocate exercise, making the counterarguments I’d make if representing the FDA. Here’s a brief summary of my arguments:
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Filed under Badges, FDA LDT Regulation, Genetic Testing/Screening, Genomic Policymaking, Genomics & Medicine, Legal & Regulatory, Pending Regulation, Uncategorized